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The Resource The case for animal rights, Tom Regan

The case for animal rights, Tom Regan

Label
The case for animal rights
Title
The case for animal rights
Statement of responsibility
Tom Regan
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Regan, Tom
Dewey number
179/.3
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Index
index present
LC call number
HV4708
LC item number
.R43 2004
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Animal rights
Label
The case for animal rights, Tom Regan
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [401]-417) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1. Animal awareness -- 1.1. Descartes's denial -- 1.2. How not to challenge Descartes -- 1.3. The principle of parsimony -- 1.4. La Mettrie's objection -- 1.5. The language test -- 1.6. Skepticism -- 1.7. Evolutionary theory and consciousness -- 1.8. Descartes's downfall -- 1.9. The cumulative argument for animal consciousness -- 1.10. Which animals are conscious? -- 1.11. Summary and conclusion -- 2. The complexity of animal awareness -- 2.1. The belief-desire theory -- 2.2. Language and belief -- 2.3. The content of belief -- 2.4. Three objections -- 2.5. The complexity of animal consciousness -- 2.6. Summary and conclusion -- 3. Animal welfare -- 3.1. The autonomy of animals -- 3.2. Interests -- 3.3. Benefits -- 3.4. Harms -- 3.5. Death -- 3.6. Paternalism and animals -- 3.7. Euthanasia and animals -- 3.8. Summary and conclusion -- 4. Ethical thinking and theory -- 4.1. Some ways not to answer moral questions -- 4.2. The ideal moral judgment -- 4.3. Criteria for evaluating moral principles -- 4.4. Consequentialist ethical theories -- 4.5. Nonconsequentialist ethical theories -- 4.6. Evaluating ethical theories -- 4.7. Summary and conclusion -- 5. Indirect duty views -- 5.1. Indirect and direct duty views -- 5.2. Moral agents and moral patients -- 5.3. Narveson's views : rational egoism -- 5.4. Rawls's position : contractarianism -- 5.5. Kant's position : humanity as end in itself -- 5.6. The moral arbitrariness of all indirect duty views -- 5.7. Summary and conclusion --
  • 6. Direct duty views -- 6.1. The cruelty-kindness view -- 6.2. Hedonistic utilitarianism -- 6.3. Preference utilitarianism -- 6.4. Singer's grounds for vegetarianism -- 6.5. Utilitarianism and speciesism -- 6.6. Summary and conclusion -- 7. Justice and equality -- 7.1. Utilitarian and perfectionist theories of justice -- 7.2. Individuals as equal in value -- 7.3. "All animals are equal" -- 7.4. Inherent value and reverence for life -- 7.5. Inherent value and the subject-of-a-life criterion -- 7.6. Justice : the principle of respect for individuals -- 7.7. Rule utilitarianism and justice -- 7.8. Defending the respect principle -- 7.9. The derivation of the harm principle -- 7.10. Summary and conclusion -- 8. The rights view -- 8.1. Moral and legal rights -- 8.2. Claims and valid claims -- 8.3. Acquired and unacquired duties -- 8.4. The respect principle and the right to respectful treatment -- 8.5. The rights of moral patients -- 8.6. A miscellany of objections -- 8.7. Overriding the right not to be harmed -- 8.8. The innocence of moral patients -- 8.9. Should the numbers count? -- 8.10. The miniride and worse-off principles -- 8.11. Why side-effects don't count -- 8.12. More objections answered -- 8.13. Unfinished business -- 8.14. Summary and conclusion -- 9. Implications of the rights view -- 9.1. Why vegetarianism is obligatory -- 9.2. Why hunting and trapping are wrong -- 9.3. How to worry about endangered species -- 9.4. Against the use of animals in science -- 9.5. Summary and conclusion
Control code
ocm54503521
Dimensions
21 cm
Edition
Updated with a new preface, 2004 ed..
Extent
lv, 425 pages
Isbn
9780520243866
Isbn Type
(pbk. : alk. paper)
Lccn
2004003833
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • 1046475
  • (Sirsi) o54503521
  • (OCoLC)54503521
Label
The case for animal rights, Tom Regan
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [401]-417) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1. Animal awareness -- 1.1. Descartes's denial -- 1.2. How not to challenge Descartes -- 1.3. The principle of parsimony -- 1.4. La Mettrie's objection -- 1.5. The language test -- 1.6. Skepticism -- 1.7. Evolutionary theory and consciousness -- 1.8. Descartes's downfall -- 1.9. The cumulative argument for animal consciousness -- 1.10. Which animals are conscious? -- 1.11. Summary and conclusion -- 2. The complexity of animal awareness -- 2.1. The belief-desire theory -- 2.2. Language and belief -- 2.3. The content of belief -- 2.4. Three objections -- 2.5. The complexity of animal consciousness -- 2.6. Summary and conclusion -- 3. Animal welfare -- 3.1. The autonomy of animals -- 3.2. Interests -- 3.3. Benefits -- 3.4. Harms -- 3.5. Death -- 3.6. Paternalism and animals -- 3.7. Euthanasia and animals -- 3.8. Summary and conclusion -- 4. Ethical thinking and theory -- 4.1. Some ways not to answer moral questions -- 4.2. The ideal moral judgment -- 4.3. Criteria for evaluating moral principles -- 4.4. Consequentialist ethical theories -- 4.5. Nonconsequentialist ethical theories -- 4.6. Evaluating ethical theories -- 4.7. Summary and conclusion -- 5. Indirect duty views -- 5.1. Indirect and direct duty views -- 5.2. Moral agents and moral patients -- 5.3. Narveson's views : rational egoism -- 5.4. Rawls's position : contractarianism -- 5.5. Kant's position : humanity as end in itself -- 5.6. The moral arbitrariness of all indirect duty views -- 5.7. Summary and conclusion --
  • 6. Direct duty views -- 6.1. The cruelty-kindness view -- 6.2. Hedonistic utilitarianism -- 6.3. Preference utilitarianism -- 6.4. Singer's grounds for vegetarianism -- 6.5. Utilitarianism and speciesism -- 6.6. Summary and conclusion -- 7. Justice and equality -- 7.1. Utilitarian and perfectionist theories of justice -- 7.2. Individuals as equal in value -- 7.3. "All animals are equal" -- 7.4. Inherent value and reverence for life -- 7.5. Inherent value and the subject-of-a-life criterion -- 7.6. Justice : the principle of respect for individuals -- 7.7. Rule utilitarianism and justice -- 7.8. Defending the respect principle -- 7.9. The derivation of the harm principle -- 7.10. Summary and conclusion -- 8. The rights view -- 8.1. Moral and legal rights -- 8.2. Claims and valid claims -- 8.3. Acquired and unacquired duties -- 8.4. The respect principle and the right to respectful treatment -- 8.5. The rights of moral patients -- 8.6. A miscellany of objections -- 8.7. Overriding the right not to be harmed -- 8.8. The innocence of moral patients -- 8.9. Should the numbers count? -- 8.10. The miniride and worse-off principles -- 8.11. Why side-effects don't count -- 8.12. More objections answered -- 8.13. Unfinished business -- 8.14. Summary and conclusion -- 9. Implications of the rights view -- 9.1. Why vegetarianism is obligatory -- 9.2. Why hunting and trapping are wrong -- 9.3. How to worry about endangered species -- 9.4. Against the use of animals in science -- 9.5. Summary and conclusion
Control code
ocm54503521
Dimensions
21 cm
Edition
Updated with a new preface, 2004 ed..
Extent
lv, 425 pages
Isbn
9780520243866
Isbn Type
(pbk. : alk. paper)
Lccn
2004003833
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • 1046475
  • (Sirsi) o54503521
  • (OCoLC)54503521

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